Quotes From a Sioux Indian Chief That Will Make You Question Everything About Our Society

Luther Standing Bear was an Oglala Lakota Sioux Chief who, among a few rare others such as Charles EastmanBlack Elk and Gertrude Bonnin occupied the rift between the way of life of the Indigenous people of the Great Plains before, and during, the arrival and subsequent spread of the European pioneers. Raised in the traditions of his people until the age of eleven, he was then educated at the Carlisle Indian Industrial Boarding School of Pennsylvania, where he learned the english language and way of life. (Though a National Historical Landmark, Carlisle remains a place of controversy in Native circles.)

Like his above mentioned contemporaries, however, his native roots were deep, leaving him in the unique position of being a conduit between cultures. Though his movement through the white man’s world was not without “success” — he had numerous movie roles in Hollywood — his enduring legacy was the protection of the way of life of his people.

By the time of his death he had published 4 books and had become a leader at the forefront of the progressive movement aimed at preserving Native American heritage and sovereignty, coming to be known as a strong voice in the education of the white man as to the Native American way of life. Here, then, are 10 quotes from the great Sioux Indian Chief known as Standing Bear that will be sure to disturb much of what you think you know about “modern” culture.

1) Praise, flattery, exaggerated manners and fine, high-sounding words were no part of Lakota politeness. Excessive manners were put down as insincere, and the constant talker was considered rude and thoughtless. Conversation was never begun at once, or in a hurried manner.

2) Children were taught that true politeness was to be defined in actions rather than in words. They were never allowed to pass between the fire and the older person or a visitor, to speak while others were speaking, or to make fun of a crippled or disfigured person. If a child thoughtlessly tried to do so, a parent, in a quiet voice, immediately set him right.

3) Silence was meaningful with the Lakota, and his granting a space of silence before talking was done in the practice of true politeness and regardful of the rule that ‘thought comes before speech.’…and in the midst of sorrow, sickness, death or misfortune of any kind, and in the presence of the notable and great, silence was the mark of respect… strict observance of this tenet of good behavior was the reason, no doubt, for his being given the false characterization by the white man of being a stoic. He has been judged to be dumb, stupid, indifferent, and unfeeling.

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4) We did not think of the great open plains, the beautiful rolling hills, the winding streams with tangled growth, as ‘wild’. Only to the white man was nature a ‘wilderness’ and only to him was it ‘infested’ with ‘wild’ animals and ‘savage’ people. To us it was tame. Earth was bountiful and we were surrounded with the blessings of the Great Mystery.

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Inner Arguments That Manifest As Struggle

If we’re experiencing any kind of struggle – with manifesting what we want, within our relationships, with our health or our bank accounts – the root cause is usually that we’re actually struggling within ourselves.

Our ego’s need for safety bickers with our Soul’s desire for self-expression. Our conscious mind is fighting with our subconscious belief system. Or maybe our inner wisdom and intuition is battling against a set of adopted values we’ve always upheld.

Here are the three most common inner arguments that we engage in, time and again.

They are not fun.

They do not create abundance.

They can’t be won.

1. I should want what I don’t really want.

We’re bombarded with messages all day long about what we “should” want. A close-knit family. A loving intimate relationship. A fit and active lifestyle. Work-life balance. A vibrant social life. A healthy diet. A six-figure income.

We should want to have it all … right?

But what if you are perfectly happy being single, enjoy the couch instead of the gym, are in love with your work to the point of obsession, and have no intention of ever giving up bacon?

All too often, we create struggle because what we think we “should” want and what actually makes us happy are two very different things.

If there’s a goal you keep struggling with, consider that it might not actually be YOUR goal at all. It might be a goal that you’ve adopted from society, your family, your friends, even your mastermind group.

Maybe you’re just regularly “shoulding” yourself into working out and leading a healthier lifestyle … but the Truth is that you don’t really want to!

Maybe you’re “shoulding” yourself into an automated sales funnel … but the Truth is, you really hate dealing with technology!

You can’t talk yourself into desire. You can try. But it’s not effective. Ever.

In fact, “shoulding” yourself into wanting what you don’t truly want may create so much preoccupation that you miss the boat on your ACTUAL Soul-inspired desires that call you into your true greatness.

2. I want you to want what you don’t really want.

It’s difficult pursuing our fullest potential when our partner, our family, and our friends are not at all interested in our vision.

Time and again, I see entrepreneurs invest huge amounts of time and energy trying to get their spouse “on board” with their big dream.

 

Read more:

http://www.empoweredsoul.com/three-no-win-arguments-that-manifest-as-struggle/